Salisbury Press

Thursday, September 19, 2019
PRESS PHOTO BY PAUL WILLISTEINSalisbury Township Police Chief Allen W. Stiles, newly-appointed Salisbury Township Animal Control Officer Michael Sinko and Salisbury Township Board of Commissioners President James A. Brown display a copy of the resolution for Sinko’s appointment at the June 22 township meeting. PRESS PHOTO BY PAUL WILLISTEINSalisbury Township Police Chief Allen W. Stiles, newly-appointed Salisbury Township Animal Control Officer Michael Sinko and Salisbury Township Board of Commissioners President James A. Brown display a copy of the resolution for Sinko’s appointment at the June 22 township meeting.

SALISBURY TOWNSHIP BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS

Thursday, June 29, 2017 by Paul Willistein pwillistein@tnonline.com in Local News

Animal control officer appointed to succeed Durner

A Salisbury Township Public Works Department employee is the new animal control officer in the township.

The township board of commissioners voted 4-0, with one commissioner absent June 22, to approve a resolution to appoint Michael Sinko as the animal control officer for the township, retroactive to June 1, at an annual compensation of $10,000.

Commissioner Vice President Robert Martucci Jr. made the motion, seconded by Commissioner Debra Brinton, to bring the resolution to a vote.

Sinko was sworn in by Salisbury Township Police Chief Allen W. Stiles. The animal control officer and enforcement of animal control ordinances is under the jurisdiction of the township police department.

Sinko is a maintenance custodian for the township public works department. His wife, Wendy, and two sons, Devyn, Southern Lehigh High School, Class of 2017 graduate and an Eagle Scout, and Ryan, a Southern Lehigh High School junior, attended the June 22 township meeting. Sinko and his family live in Upper Saucon Township.

After his appointment at the meeting, Sinko told a reporter for The Press he had assisted Charles J. Durner Jr., the previous township animal control officer. Durner, township animal control officer, recycling centers coordinator, Franko Farm Park farmhouse caretaker and retired township police chief, died Jan. 20.

“Mike has been filling that role and he has been doing an exceptional job,” Salisbury Township Manager Cathy Bonaskiewich said prior to the vote to appoint Sinko, adding, “And he even has some ideas of his own.”

Martucci, Brinton, Commissioner President James A. Brown and Commissioner James Seagreaves voiced support of Sinko prior to their vote.

“I really want to thank you,” Sinko said to commissioners after the vote, vowing to promote public safety and ensure the safety of animals. Sinko noted his family has two rescue dogs as pets.

“I’m sure this position will be fun to reunite a dog with its owner, but it may also be sometimes dangerous,” Sinko said.

In other business at the June 22 township meeting, commissioners voted 4-0 to:

Approve a motion to accept the bid received June 12 for the water main (Edgemont, Meadowbrook and Bellair) and sewer force main (Cardinal) replacement projects from Michael F. Ronca & Sons, Inc. in the amount of $841,000. Seagreaves made the motion, seconded by Brinton, to bring the motion to a vote.

Before the voting, Bonaskiewich noted the funding for the project is provided through the township’s 2016 bond reissue.

After the meeting, Salisbury Township Director of Public Works John Andreas told a reporter for The Press the work is expected to begin in about one month and to be completed by the fall or winter of this year.

During the workshop at the June 22 township meeting, commissioners heard a review of the township’s audited financials for the fiscal year ending Dec. 31, 2016, from township financial consultant and auditor, Todd J. Bushta, CPA, Bushta & Co, LLC.

“Under Cathy’s [Bonaskiewich] leadership and staff, the records were impeccable,” Bushta told commissioners.

“Refinancing the series 2010 with 2016 bonds was a smart move,” Bushta said.

“The increase in the water fund is improving,” Bushta said.

There is a $74,000 surplus in the township water fund, according to Bushta.

“The sewer fund has a significant deficit,” Bushta said.

“There are infrastructure needs,” Bushta said.

Bushta concluded by saying township internal controls are appropriate.