Salisbury Press

Thursday, January 18, 2018
PRESS PHOTO BY PAUL WILLISTEINSalisbury Township Board of Commissioners President James A. Brown, left, accepts a commemorative plaque from township board Vice President Robert Martucci Jr., right, at the Dec. 28, 2017 meeting. It was Brown’s last board meeting as commissioner. Brown didn’t seek re-election. PRESS PHOTO BY PAUL WILLISTEINSalisbury Township Board of Commissioners President James A. Brown, left, accepts a commemorative plaque from township board Vice President Robert Martucci Jr., right, at the Dec. 28, 2017 meeting. It was Brown’s last board meeting as commissioner. Brown didn’t seek re-election.
Well-wishers, including Salisbury Township Chief of Police Allen W. Stiles, center, attends a reception following the last township board meeting for commissioner of James A. Brown, right. Well-wishers, including Salisbury Township Chief of Police Allen W. Stiles, center, attends a reception following the last township board meeting for commissioner of James A. Brown, right.

SALISBURY TOWNSHIP BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS

Thursday, January 4, 2018 by Paul Willistein pwillistein@tnonline.com in Local News

Brown lauded for township service

James A. Brown capped a 14-year career as Salisbury Township commissioner with teary eyes and fond farewells.

Brown, township board of commissioners’ president, chose to not run for re-election.

At the Dec. 28, 2017 meeting, his last township meeting as commissioner, Brown was presented with a commemorative plaque by board of commissioners’ Vice President Robert Martucci Jr., who also read a resolution approved by a 5-0 vote by commissioners that lauded Brown for his 14 years of service.

Commissioner James Seagreaves, prior to the resolution vote, quipped, “Again, if we don’t pass it, he doesn’t resign?” referring to the resolution and Brown.

“Sorry, Rodney,” Martucci joked to Rodney Conn, who was in the audience. Conn was elected in 2017 to represent the Fourth Ward, succeeding Brown.

The commissioners’ resolution of appreciation states Brown served “with loyalty, ability, dedication and distinction.

“The exemplary conduct and sense of fairness he demonstrated in all his activities has been a positive influence in the growth and progress of our community,” stated the resolution.

Brown was recognized for “his distinguished service as a member of the Salisbury Township Board of Commissioners.”

The resolution was the last item of business on the meeting agenda. At the start of the meeting in the township municipal building, Brown said, “This is my last meeting after 14 years.

“I’d like to thank the voters of the fourth ward who voted for me.

“I’d like to thank the staff and the department heads in this building.

“But most of all, I’d like to thank my fellow commissioners,” Brown said.

Glancing around at commissioners seated at the meeting room dais, Brown added, “We don’t always see eye-to-eye, but we have the interests of the township at heart.”

Salisbury Township Manager Cathy Bonaskiewich said to Brown, “That was very well-said, and you will be very missed.”

“It was a pleasure working with you all these years,” Salisbury Township Assistant Zoning Officer Sandy Nicolo said, adding, “It was a pleasure to have you on the township board.”

Before the start of the meeting, Brown announced a recess for an executive session for a personnel matter.

When commissioners returned after about 15 minutes, Bonaskiewich said there would be an addition to the agenda. Commissioners voted 5-0 to accept the resignation of Bryan Losagio as a corporal. Losagio will return to duties as a patrol officer.

The commissioners’ vote included authorization to activate the township Civil Service Commission to draw up a list of eligible police officer candidates for the hiring of two officers approved as part of the 2018 township budget.

After the meeting, Salisbury Township Police Chief Allen W. Stiles told a reporter for The Press he couldn’t disclose the reason for Losagio’s letter of resignation because it’s a personnel matter, which is not made public. Stiles did say there was no criminal conduct involved and Losagio requested to be removed as corporal. Stiles said the matter was the topic for the Dec. 28, 2017 meeting’s executive session. Losagio, who has been with the township police department since 2001, was appointed as a corporal in January 2017.

Following the 30-minute meeting, a reception for Brown was held which included sandwiches, vegetables and dip and pastries.

When asked what he would do on the second and fourth Thursdays of the month, when commissioners meet, now that he would no longer be attending township meetings, Brown gave a one-word answer to a reporter for The Press: “Relax.”

Brown added, “I’m loving retirement.” Brown retired in August 2017 from Home Depot. However, to keep busy, he said, he started driving a school bus for Paragon Transit in the Lehigh Valley.

Brown said he and his wife, Donna, would spend more time visiting their grandchildren, Allyson, 3, and Harrison, four months, and their son, Tyler, and daughter-in-law, Amie, who reside in the Harrisburg area.

He will also be doing more reading. “I like to read mystery novels,” Brown noted.

“It’s been a fun 14 years,” Brown reflected on his years as commissioner.

Brown praised the township staff and department heads: “They work very well together.

“And I think that’s what makes Salisbury Township a place where people want to live,” Brown said.