Salisbury Press

Tuesday, December 11, 2018
PRESS PHOTOS BY JIM MARSHThree entrants participate in Salisbury High School physics teacher Paul Koba’s annual turkey toss competition on a very chilly Wednesday morning the day before Thanksgiving on an athletic field behind the school. PRESS PHOTOS BY JIM MARSHThree entrants participate in Salisbury High School physics teacher Paul Koba’s annual turkey toss competition on a very chilly Wednesday morning the day before Thanksgiving on an athletic field behind the school.
Salisbury High School seniors Lucas Wood, left and Joe Zellin are the only male entrants in the 2018 annual turkey toss competition. The duo built a traditional trebuchet machine modeled on those used by invading armies in Medieval times in Europe and the United Kingdom.PRESS PHOTO BY JIM MARSH Salisbury High School seniors Lucas Wood, left and Joe Zellin are the only male entrants in the 2018 annual turkey toss competition. The duo built a traditional trebuchet machine modeled on those used by invading armies in Medieval times in Europe and the United Kingdom.PRESS PHOTO BY JIM MARSH
SHS seniors Peyton Stauffer, Madison Jewell, Gabriella Grym and Rylee Donaldson build a catapult machine modeled on weapons used by Medieval armies. Their machine won the toss for the longest flight, although it fell short of the school turkey toss record of 70 yards set in 2013. SHS seniors Peyton Stauffer, Madison Jewell, Gabriella Grym and Rylee Donaldson build a catapult machine modeled on weapons used by Medieval armies. Their machine won the toss for the longest flight, although it fell short of the school turkey toss record of 70 yards set in 2013.
Salisbury High School senior Ashley Karol is a solo entrant in the annual turkey toss competition with a crossbow machine. Salisbury High School senior Ashley Karol is a solo entrant in the annual turkey toss competition with a crossbow machine.

SALISBURY HIGH SCHOOL

Wednesday, November 28, 2018 by JIM MARSH Special to The Press in Local News

No thaw for annual turkey toss competition

Each year, on the last school day before the Thanksgiving recess at Salisbury High School, physics instructor Paul Koba offers extra course credit to any of his students who build simple machines modeled on siege machine weapons used by armies in Medieval Europe and the United Kingdom. The machines are employed to see how far the competitors can toss a long-frozen turkey down an athletic field behind the school.

This year’s competition was abbreviated by exceptionally chilly weather preceding the Thanksgiving holiday.

“It’s a practical and fun activity to apply principles taught in a module of our physics class,” Koba said.

Koba keeps the playing field level for competitors year to year by using the same frozen turkey he won in a bowling competition back in the 1990s.

The annual competition, in its 23rd year, enables learning outside the traditional classroom environment, Koba said and recognizes achievement by other than those competitors in the school’s sporting endeavors.