Salisbury Press

Monday, October 21, 2019
PHOTOS COURTESY OF STEVEN TREMBLAYHarry S Truman Elementary School students grew nutritious food indoors as part of a science project in the 2018-2019 academic year. ABOVE: Logan Cramsey and Lucas Strickland measure plant growth. PHOTOS COURTESY OF STEVEN TREMBLAYHarry S Truman Elementary School students grew nutritious food indoors as part of a science project in the 2018-2019 academic year. ABOVE: Logan Cramsey and Lucas Strickland measure plant growth.
Kayleigh Gasdik prepares seed blocks for the project. Kayleigh Gasdik prepares seed blocks for the project.
Jenna Swoyer, Emerson Bower, Aleyka Ramos, Slade Crocus and Aaliyah Ross enjoy a salad party featuring vegetables they grew in school. Jenna Swoyer, Emerson Bower, Aleyka Ramos, Slade Crocus and Aaliyah Ross enjoy a salad party featuring vegetables they grew in school.
PRESS PHOTO BY SARAH TAKACSLeafy greens and other vegetables flourish in the growing tower. PRESS PHOTO BY SARAH TAKACSLeafy greens and other vegetables flourish in the growing tower.
PHOTO COURTESY OF SUSAN YOUNGIsabella Wygand checks on plant growth. PHOTO COURTESY OF SUSAN YOUNGIsabella Wygand checks on plant growth.
PHOTO COURTESY OF SUSAN YOUNGShelby Tenzer is among students tending the vegetables and lettuces. PHOTO COURTESY OF SUSAN YOUNGShelby Tenzer is among students tending the vegetables and lettuces.

HARRY S TRUMAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Thursday, July 18, 2019 by SARAH TAKACS Special to The Press in School

Students grow nutritious food indoors

What if you could grow food year-round, on a self-sustainable setup that required little maintenance to be successful? Would you try it? Well that’s just what the students in the fourth grade at Harry S Truman Elementary School accomplished this academic year.

Fourth grade teacher Steven Tremblay developed the idea from a contact through JuicePlus, a brand of fortified dietary supplements and a desire to help students eat healthier foods.

Teachers in the Salisbury Township School District have a requirement for task redesigning in the area of science and Tremblay applied for a grant from the Salisbury Foundation to develop his idea. The $500 grant was used for the project.

With the funding, he was able to purchase a growing tower, growing lights, chemicals needed for the project, as well as seeds for various vegetables.

The Harry S Truman PTO also assisted with funding to cover costs exceeding the grant amount.

All fourth grade students had roles in the project. Students set up the equipment, planted seeds, monitored pH levels, added nutrients and tracked plant growth

Students grew Swiss chard, bibb lettuce, celery, romaine lettuce, parsley, oregano, cilantro, basil and several other vegetables.

Students celebrated their achievement with a salad party to enjoy their hard work.

Tremblay hopes to add another growing tower so other grades can have the experience as well.

Tremblay said students really enjoyed the experience this year and hope to do it again next year.